Warning! Cevical Cancer can Kill You

The death of Julia Perez in Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM) Jakarta last Saturday (10/6) can be a lesson for women, especially for cervical cancer patients. The cancer caused by HPV (Human Paviloma Virus) that attacks the cervix is one of the disease killers for women. The symptoms are such as bleeding in vital organs after sex, non-menstrual period, and even after menopause.

Saiful Anwar Hospital Handles about 487 Patients in a Month

The death of Julia Perez in Dr Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (RSCM) Jakarta last Saturday (10/6) can be a lesson for women, especially for cervical cancer patients. The cancer caused by HPV (Human Paviloma Virus) that attacks the cervix is one of the disease killers for women. The symptoms are such as bleeding in vital organs after sex, non-menstrual period, and even after menopause.

Ironically, the number of cervical cancer patients in Great Malang is big. Based on the data of Saiful Anwar Hospital (RSSA), there are about 486 patients in treatment in a month with total of 1,457 patients up to March 2017. This number of patients is predicted to keep increasing and there were 5,564 patients in 2015 that increased to 6,099 patients in 2016.

The Head of RSSA’s Sub-section of Law and Public Relation Titiek Intiyas Hidayati mentioned, the data of the cervical cancer patients are also referral from several other hospitals in Great Malang because severe patients are referred to RSSA. “The only hospital with cervical cancer specialists and complete facility is RSSA,” said Titiek.

A doctor as well as a pioneer of cervical cancer prevention movement, dr Lula Kamal, said to Jawa Pos Radar Malang yesterday (12/6), “Once in an hour, a woman dies because of cervical cancer in Indonesia.”



This kind of cancer, Lula Kamal added, is contagious in two ways. First, it can be through genital contact, oral genital and genital manual, so sexually active women tend to be at risk for HPV infection. Second, transmission can be through the mother to her baby. “Married women should do PAP smear,” said the doctor of magister alumnus at King’s College London.

PAP smear is a procedure to test the presence of cervical cancer in women. Lula also suggested the women to do visual inspection with lactic acid once in a year. It is an early detection procedure of alternative cervical cancers to check for areas that PAP smear cannot reach. “Midwifes can do this kind of examination,” explained the doctor who is also a famous artists.

Meanwhile, the level of awareness of women to check cervical cancer is still low. The data from Malang Health Department showed that in January-April 2017 only 3,171 women of 30-50 years old doing the heck up in 16 healthcare centers despite a total of 257,209 women. It means that only 1.2 percent people are aware of the cancer.

Nine of the 3,171 women are tested positive for cervical cancer and six other women are predicted to have HPV. Of the 15 women, the seven of them are referred to undergo further examination in RSSA Malang City.

The Head of Disease Prevention and Control Division of Malang City Health Department Husnul Muarif explained, there are two methods of early cervical center detection, but healthcare centers can only serve through visual inspection with lactic acid. Healthcare centers cannot do PAP smear, taking mucus from inside the female genitals for tasting, yet. “The visual inspection can be for women about 30-50 years old,” revealed Husnul.

Vaccine can also prevent the cancer. However, the vaccine is not for free. “We give it for free on special days such as Kartini’s Day, National Health Day, Cancer’s Day,” conveyed the alumnus of Medical Department of University of Airlangga, Surabaya.

The Health Department’s party also appealed to people: Firstly, for your women to immunize HPV; secondly, to have a clean and healthy lifestyle, including not changing couples; thirdly, to maintain endurance and have a balanced food.

Another handling for cervical cancer patients is by palliative care. This kind of care is for end-stage patients, focusing on patients’ psychology.

Dr Wang Ellyana, a member of Batu City Baptis Hospital’s palliative team stated, this care is to improve the life quality of cancer patients. “Let’s say, a cancer patient has undergone chemotherapy and surgery, but her illness is still there and doctor have given up on her. Shall we abandon the patient? We can’t! It the time for the palliative team to play a part,” she said. (viq/nr1/nr3/abm)